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Using the InnoDB Buffer Pool Pre-Load Feature in MySQL 5.7

Using the InnoDB Buffer Pool Pre-Load Feature in MySQL 5.7
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In this blog post, I’ll discuss how to use the InnoDB buffer pool pre-load feature in MySQL 5.7 Starting MySQL 5.6, you can configure MySQL to save the contents of your InnoDB buffer pool and load it on startup. Starting in MySQL 5.7, this is the default behavior. Without any special effort, MySQL saves and restores a portion of buffer pool in the default configuration. We made a similar feature available in Percona Server 5.5 – so the concept has been around for quite a while.
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