Access 2010 Managing Databases and Objects

Each Access database consists of multiple objects that let you interact with data. Databases can include forms for entering data, queries for searching within it, reports for analyzing it, and of course, tables for storing it. Whenever you work with your database, you are working with many of these objects at once. Fortunately, Access makes managing these objects pretty easy.
In this lesson, you will learn how to to open and close databases, as well as how to open, close, and save objects.

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Access 2010 Introduction to Objects
Databases in Access 2010 are composed of four objects: tables, queries, forms, and reports. Together, these objects allow you to enter, store, analyze, and compile your data as you wish.
In this lesson, you will learn about each of the four objects and come to understand how they interact with each other to create a fully functional relational database.


Access 2010: Databases comparison with AccdbMerge
Compare MS Access Databases, Find Differences & Merge Objects: Comparing multiple objects from two separate MS Access databases is not only difficult, but also quite a tedious task, as one needs to first check each data set in databases, and then make required changes to DB objects. If you’re working with multiple versions of Access database, you may be looking for a tool that can help you identify the differences between all major objects of database, including tables, forms, reports, queries and so on. Instead of tallying each dataset and DB objects, you could use AccdbMerge to instantly view the differences, and import & export selected objects from both database versions to easily merge the required sections. AccdbMerge supports both widely used Access database formats, including MDB and ACCDB, allowing you to read all the elements of database without having to install any additional tools.


Access 2010 troubleshooting
I have been experiencing some problems ever since the company I work for changed from Office 2007 to 2010. I am unable to create a lookup box in a table or a combo box in a form without getting one of three error messages (attached).

Sometimes the program just shuts down when I attempt either of the above and I get the "Microsoft Access has stopped working" message.

This is preventing me from managing/amending databases previously created in 2007.

Can anyone advise me on what the problem could be and how it can be fixed? We have tried un-installing and re-installing the programme without success


Make Database Application Form In Access 2010
Creating a database in Access 2010 is rather easy than other RDBMS tools available out there. Apart from providing tools, features and function for creating and managing databases efficiently, it also allow users to create a database application, so you can give it to your client or any other concerned party. Adding more, you can customize the overall look of application while creating one by confining client to use only specific part of database.


Creating an MS Access Database, Tables, and Fields
Microsoft Access is a database management system used to create relational databases. Within a database a number of different objects can be contained including tables for storing data and queries for viewing subsets of that data. Database applications such as MS Access are extremely powerful tools for organizing, archiving, updating, searching and generally managing large blocks of related data.


Access 2007 vs. Access 2010
My computers were recently upgraded from Windows XP and Office 2007 to Windows 7 and Office 2010. I am responsible for three Access databases that are used by some of our affiliates. I recently made changes to those files in Access 2010, and now our affiliates are receiving error messages when they use the files.

The files will not compact - they receive an error message that they do not have the correct version of Access to do that.

I had Access 2007 installed on one of my computers and receive the same error when I try to compact the databases. Thechanges I made included modifying queries, relinking a table from a SQL Server database, and changing a couple of macros.

They also receive a warning that the files are incompatible.

I made new files using Office 2007, imported the objects from the files I'd worked on in 2010, and asked one of our affiliates to test the file. Same issues except he did not receive the compatibility warning.


Why is the delete option greyed out in MS 2010 navigation pane?
Two weeks ago I had Office 2010 and Windows 7 installed on my work computer. Before that I had Office 2007 and XP. Before the move to 2010 I could delete objects in the navigation pane, now I cannot.

* I am working in MS 2003 databases.
* These are not secured databases.
* I have checked the Options settings but did not recognize anything that might be contributing to this issue.

I have Googled this subject for the last 2 hours and the closet I could come was somebody had an issue with migrating a 2003 database to 2010, something I am not doing, and it was a secured database. This is pretty critical as obviously not being allowed to delete an object makes for one junky database, and I do not want to become a hoarder


Access 2010 SP1 – Random crashes in certain database or when opening the VBA
After installing Office 2010 SP1, you may receive random crashes when opening objects in certain databases and when trying to open the VBA window in those databases. If you look in theevent viewer the crash info may look similar to the following:

Faulting application: msaccess.exe
Version: 14.0.6024.1000
Stamp: 4d83e4fc
faulting module: vbe7.dll
version: 7.0.16.19
stamp: 4d430aec


Display Object Dependencies
In this article, we will examine a feature that is new in MS Office Access 2003, and which offers great potential in our documentation, maintenance, and general upkeep efforts, from the perspective of the organizations MS Access databases. In MS Office Access 2003, we can directly and easily view information on dependencies between database objects. The capability to view a list of a database's objects, particularly within the context of how those objects relate to each other, can help us to maintain a database over time. The capability is perhaps most useful in helping us to avoid errors that emerge with the uninformed removal of record sources or other databases objects, but numerous other potential uses exist, as well.


Issues with Access 2010
We have begun migrating to Office 2010 where I work. All of our databases were created in Access 2003 and have remained in this format since the majority of them use user-level security.

When we switched to 2007, there were some minor issues with macros that were easily cleared up by adding some new trusted locations. After those changes were made, the databases ran perfectly just as they did in 2003.

However, now that they have begun pushing out 2010, there are some bigger issues with the databases and I'm hoping it can be fixed as easily as the issues in the previous conversion.

The problems we are seeing now are:

1) The ribbon that is normally across the top of the screen is no longer there.

2) Holding the shift key down to show the navigation pane no longer works when opening the databases.


MS Access as a Documentation Tool: Display Object Dependencies
In this article, we will examine a feature that is new in MS Office Access 2003, and which offers great potential in our documentation, maintenance, and general upkeep efforts, from the perspective of the organizations MS Access databases. In MS Office Access 2003, we can directly and easily view information on dependencies between database objects. The capability to view a list of a database's objects, particularly within the context of how those objects relate to each other, can help us to maintain a database over time. The capability is perhaps most useful in helping us to avoid errors that emerge with the uninformed removal of record sources or other databases objects, but numerous other potential uses exist, as well.


Access 2003 - Access 2010 Compatabiliy tool
Is there a tool that can analyze Access 2003 databases for potential issues when converted to Access 2010. I have over 200 Access databases I need to convert to Access 2010 and I would like to know if I am going to have issues before I start


Database Corruption & Repair
A Microsoft Access database may consist of data and indexes as well as the database objects: tables, queries, reports, forms, macros and modules. The best way to protect against loss of data and databases due to corruption is to backup your databases often. Microsoft Access provides a Compact and Repair utility to assist in recovering corrupted databases. However, these utilities have limitations and may not fully recover the database, its objects or its data management functions.


Error - Oject or Class does not support the set of events
I have two Databases in 2003 that I built and use for work. Never had any problems until the IT installed 2010 on all computers, so I have both 2003 & 2010 on my PC. Although I still open my original Databases in 2003 I now receive the above message on both databases.


Access Databases with new Office 2010
I have a question to make. I have a production server that is a file server, holds shares and some databases in access 2003 format. (mdb or mde) files. We added a new WS2008 server and want to move the shares and databases in it. We are going to install Office 2010 professional in it. Are we supposed to have any problems? Users in the company will still use office 2003 suites in their pcs. Do all the users need to update to office 2010? We are planning it, and we will do it some day eventually but I want to ask if users with office 2003 can open the network database on the server with office


Using Jet Data Access Objects (VB6)
Lets start by clearing up a common point of confusion regarding Access and Jet. Jet is a database engine. It handles the i/o to the database and provides programmable objects representing the database. Access is an application which can be used to build databases. While both share the same Jet database engine, when you are working with databases in Visual Basic, you are working with Jet, not Access.


Object spacing tools broken in Access 2010
I have recently installed and started using access 2010. So far I like it a great deal better than 2007, however I encountered a pretty nasty problem. When designing my forms, I rely heavily on the Size/Space tools to organize and align my objects. The spacing tools however seem to be broken, particularly the Horizontal once. In access 2007, I could select a number of controls, hit Equal Horizontal, and have the horizontal distance between the objects the same. Then I would use Increase/Decrease Horizontal to further tweak it. In Access 2010, none of this seems to work. Can anybody using Access 2010 confirm that this is indeed a bug, and if so what are some potential workarounds


When web users use 'client' database objects?
I am designing a web database in Access 2010 so that company employees and managers can enter and manage data. As it grows (as databases seem to do), I increasingly want to make some 'client' features available to branch managers - like providing them with detailed financial reports with charts and queries that allow date selection criteria.

Because I'm finding it hard to find an Access Services host, I've not yet been able to trial it.

In the Access help I read that: "People can open the web database in Access, and then use the client objects.

Can anyone who has published a web database assure me that this means that a user who has Access 2010 installed can log in to the web-database - and use 'client' functions? This is what I'dlike to believe from the above,

(and bearing in mind how user permissions are organised in Sharepoint), can I then organise it so that employees have access to one level of data on their web browsers,and managers use their logins to be able to use the more flexible 'client' functions - also by logging on to the web? then MSAccess 2010 really does rock!


Upgrading from Office XP to Office 2010
We have a number of inhouse Access database that were built using Office XP. Currently all of our users run Office XP.
We are going to be upgrading all of our users to Office 2010. We would like to ensure that our Access databases are still operational.
Has anyone had any expriences of this?
What issues were encountered?
What plans/tasks do I need to consider before the upgrade?
What tasks do I need to do to the databases so that they still work in Office 2010?


Access 2010 Introduction to Databases
In this lesson, you will learn about databases and how they are used. You will familiarize yourself with the differences between data management in Access and Microsoft Excel. Finally, you will get a look ahead at the rest of the Access course.